Drilling a glass tank

Discussion in 'Marine Tech' started by MaRy, May 31, 2014.

  1. MaRy

    MaRy New Member

    Who should I contact in Madison to drill my glass tank for an overflow? & before u suggest it, I am not attempting this myself, I don't have the equipment anyway. lol
  2. mlaursen

    mlaursen Advisory Board

    What size tank is it? Bottom or sides?
  3. MaRy

    MaRy New Member

    72 gallon bow front. Probably the side.
  4. mlaursen

    mlaursen Advisory Board

    On a bow front it would have to be the side, the bottom is tempered. What size hole. I use a diamond bit with a pool if water for lubrication. If you look on YouTube there are some good videos
  5. MaRy

    MaRy New Member

    I already said I'm not going to attempt this myself. lol I want to know where to take it to & have it done for me ;)
  6. Marine590622

    Marine590622 Advisory Board Staff Member

    MaRy likes this.
  7. MaRy

    MaRy New Member

    Thank you. Did u have a price? I'm going to ask Living Art too as soon as I can get a hold of them. Hopefully they opened back up again today.
  8. Marine590622

    Marine590622 Advisory Board Staff Member

    I think I remember something like $20 dollars fora hole.
    MaRy likes this.
  9. tjudy

    tjudy Advisory Board Staff Member

    I can drill it for you, but you would need to bring the tank out to my fish room in Stoughton. What size ports will you need? If you need bulkheads I have some 3/4" ID threaded/slip with elbows and flat screens. I have a few larger too.
    MaRy likes this.
  10. MaRy

    MaRy New Member

    I'm actually not sure about the plumbing yet. This is my 1st sump set up. I haven't bought any equipment yet because I wasn't sure if I was going to be able to drill it or not. Recommendations for all needed overflow equipment would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
  11. Aquaticus

    Aquaticus Advisory Board

    I'm a big fan of sump systems for the right occasions, but I don't have any right now because they can be loud and tricky, and wet/dry's can be overkill depending on what you are trying to do. If this is your first sump setup, I'd make 100% sure that you want a sump system before drilling a tank and then wishing later that you had gone with a canister filter instead. My two cents.
  12. MaRy

    MaRy New Member

    I believe a sump/refugium is the best filtration option. I'm going Discus & just want the best, u know? I'd hate to shy away from the best out of fear from lack of experience. Need to get it somewhere! lol However, I totally see your point. Give me some details & talk me out of it. lol
  13. tjudy

    tjudy Advisory Board Staff Member

    The only advantage (other than aesthetics) I can think of for using a sump with discus is the increase in water volume in the system, making it more stable. However, if you intend to do a lot of large water changes (which the discus like), the added volume of a sump becomes a hindrance because you need to account for the volume of the sump when to do the water change. In my opinion, wet dry filters are for situations where you do not want to change water frequently (such as a marine tank).
    Aquaticus likes this.
  14. Aquaticus

    Aquaticus Advisory Board

    I've had sumps on a lot of systems over the years, most recently on a four tank setup about a year and a half ago. It worked great, but it was louder than I liked. If you want a quiet sump system, you'll need to have a fairly complex setup. Check out this article on PlantedTank.net for a good overview. Sump systems have some great advantages, especially in situations where you have a high bio load, including quick breakdown of nitrogenous waste and high oxygen levels, but that can also be a detriment in other situations, like unfertilized and non-co2 planted tanks.

    Personally, I'd go with a canister filter with a plan to do regular large water changes for discus. You can buy an inline heater if you don't want a heater in the tank.
    MaRy likes this.
  15. MaRy

    MaRy New Member

    I suppose I will revisit the canister idea. I was looking at the Fluval & Eheim pro models. Any recommendations? lol
  16. duane stuermer

    duane stuermer Active Member

    For me changing water in a sump system is the quickest and easiest way to do water changes I've done.
    I have a Tee on the line to the sump, if I open a valve, instead of water going to the sump, it goes to my back yard. 50 gallons goes to the yard in 5 minutes.
    Drilling is very simple, if you get a diamond bit, I have drilled 8 tanks with that bit so far, and plan on at least 8 more, well worth the price of the bit.
    And with the drilled tanks, I put 4 or 5 tanks on each sump, making changing water on those 4 or 5 tanks a snap.
    MaRy likes this.
  17. MaRy

    MaRy New Member

    I started cycling it already. However, now it looks like we might be moving to San Francisco so I will just end up draining it soon anyway. lol So maybe I will try to find someone to drill it out west. :)

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